The Office of Institutional Research and Assessment provides meaningful information to support reporting, assessment, institutional planning, policy development and decision making that fulfill the mission and goals of the University.

Findings from the Student Satisfaction Inventory™ are automatically compared to national standards by institution type on the following scales.

  • Academic Advising Effectiveness (also called Academic Advising and Counseling Effectiveness) assesses the academic advising Subscription and Support 12 Months program, evaluating advisors and counselors on their knowledge, competence, approachability, and personal concern for students.
  • Campus Climate evaluates how the institution promotes a sense of campus pride and belonging.
  • Campus Support Services assesses the quality of support programs and services.
  • Concern for the Individual assesses your commitment to treating each student as an individual. This assessment includes groups who deal personally with students (e.g., faculty, advisors, counselors, and staff).
  • Instructional Effectiveness measures students’ academic experiences, the curriculum, and the campus’s commitment to academic excellence.
  • Admissions and Financial Aid Effectiveness measures the competence of admissions counselors, along with students’ perceptions of the financial aid programs.
  • Registration Effectiveness assesses registration and billing, including how smooth the registration process is.
  • Responsiveness to Diverse Populations assesses the institution’s commitment to specific groups of students enrolled at the institution (e.g., under-represented populations, students with disabilities, commuters, part-time students, and adult learners).
  • Safety and Security measures the campus’ responsiveness to students’ personal safety and security.
  • Service Excellence measures quality of service and personal concern for students in various areas of campus.
  • Student Centeredness measures the institution’s attitude toward students and the extent to which they feel welcome and valued.

By using the Adult Student Priorities Survey, you’ll see what’s important to your adult students and how satisfied they are, along with national benchmark comparison data.  The survey encompasses the full range of adult student experiences.

How satisfied are today’s adult and distance learners in higher education? What issues do they feel are most important to their college experiences?

The  ASPS reports detail findings from adult learners, including:

  • Adult students at adult‐learner‐focused institutions
  • Adult students in undergraduate and graduate programs
  • Online distance learners

The reports provide excellent benchmarks for assessing student satisfaction among your own students.

The CIRP Freshman Survey is designed for administration to incoming first‐year students before they start classes at your institution. The instrument collects extensive information that allows for a snapshot of what your incoming students are like before they experience college. Key sections of the survey examine:

  • Established behaviors in high school;
  • Academic preparedness;
  • Admissions decisions;
  • Expectations of college;
  • Interactions with peers and faculty;
  • Student values and goals and
  • Student demographic characteristics; and
  • Concerns about financing college.

Many of the items on the CIRP Freshman Survey are pre‐test questions that are then post‐tested on CIRP follow‐up surveys, the YFCY, DLE, and the CSS, providing for longitudinal examination of cognitive and affective growth during college. All CIRP surveys allow you to add questions of your own on the instrument.

Schools participating in the CIRP Freshman Survey receive an institutional profile, which includes your institutional results broken out by sex, full and part‐time status, comparisons with other similar institutions, significance testing, effect sizes, CIRP Constructs, and Theme reports, a data file of your student responses; and a monograph summarizing the national results.

Your First College Year is a survey designed to provide higher education practitioners and researchers with comprehensive information on the academic and personal development of first‐year college students.  YFCY was designed as a follow‐up survey to the annual Cooperative Institutional Research Program (CIRP) Freshman Survey and allows for longitudinal research on the first year of college.
Specifically, colleges use the YFCY to:

  • Evaluate student adjustment to college
  • Assess students’ academic experiences and achievement
  • Collect information about extracurricular experiences
  • Study-specific first‐year programs
  • Examine student change

As a follow‐up instrument, YFCY is designed to help institutions assess how their students have changed since entering college. When combined with CIRP Freshman Survey data, the YFCY serves as a longitudinal measure of students’ cognitive and affective growth during the first year.
The YFCY also includes space for up to 20 institution‐specific questions.

Schools participating in the YFCY receive an institutional profile, which includes your institutional results broken out by sex, full and part‐time status, comparisons with other similar institutions, significance testing, effect sizes, CIRP Constructs, and Theme reports, and a data file of your student responses. Schools using the YFCY as a post‐test to the CIRP Freshman Survey will also receive a Longitudinal Profile, which can be used to assess growth and change over the first year of college.

The College Senior Survey (CSS) is designed as an exit survey for graduating seniors. The CSS focuses on a broad range of college outcomes and post‐college goals and plans including:

  • academic achievement and engagement
  • student‐faculty interaction
  • cognitive and affective development
  • student goals and values
  • satisfaction with the college experience
  • degree aspirations and career plans
  • post‐college plans

Schools participating in the CSS receive an institutional profile, which includes your institutional results broken out by sex, full and part‐time status, comparisons with other similar institutions, significance testing, effect sizes, CIRP Constructs, and Theme reports, and a data file of your student responses. Schools using the CSS as a post‐test to the CIRP Freshman Survey, YFCY, or DLE will also receive a Longitudinal Profile, which can be used to assess growth and change over time.

Student engagement represents two critical features of collegiate quality. The first is the amount of time and effort students put into their studies and other educationally purposeful activities. The second is how the institution deploys its resources and organizes the curriculum and other learning opportunities to get students to participate in activities that decades of research studies show are linked to student learning.

Through its student survey, The College Student Report, NSSE annually collects information at hundreds of four‐year colleges and universities about student participation in programs and activities that institutions provide for their learning and personal development. The results provide an estimate of how undergraduates spend their time and what they gain from attending college.

NSSE provides participating institutions with a variety of reports that compare their students’ responses with those of students at self‐selected groups of comparison institutions. Comparisons are available for individual survey questions and the five NSSE Benchmarks of Effective Educational Practice. Each November, NSSE also publishes its Annual Results, which reports topical research and trends in student engagement results.

About NSSE

Kirstin Krug, Institutional Research Analyst
Email: kkrug@snu.edu
Phone: 405-491-6609
Fax: 405-491-6381

Information Request

Have a need for a data report? Click here to request your information.

Translate »